Conflict with terror a feminist issue

 

“Just take off your scarf,” I said naively to the Shi’ite refugee in the heat of a Phoenix summer.

Amina Lawal, holds her child Wasila inside a Sharia court of appeal in the Northern city ot Katsina, Nigeria, Tuesday March 25, 2003. Lawal, 31, was sentenced to death by stoning in March 2002 for giving birth to a child out of wedlock. (AP Photo/George Osodi)

Amina Lawal, holds her child Wasila inside a Sharia court of appeal in the Northern city ot Katsina, Nigeria, Tuesday March 25, 2003. Lawal, 31, was sentenced to death by stoning in March 2002 for giving birth to a child out of wedlock. (AP Photo/George Osodi)

She drew her finger across her neck, indicating that her father would cut her throat.

Then I understood.  To take off her head covering would be to break Muslim law.

She was ruled by shari’a law.

Do you know what that is?

For the radical Islamicist, shari’a law represents salvation and hope.  It is the law that radical Islamicist fight to have imposed through court systems the world over.

To them, it is the way to bring the kingdom of God to earth. As the will of God revealed through the Qur’an, it is the answer to the human condition.

Part of this picture is that the Muslim representatives of God must exercise political power on this earth. That’s the way they make God’s will happen—through authority.  That means enforcement through the justice system and pure force.

Let me reiterate, this is the radical Muslim view, which has been in a revival mode.

It is no secret that shari’a law is particularly restrictive to women, constraining dress, divorce law and personal freedoms.

Just ask a Muslim woman what that means. Ask her what stoning is.

The enemy combatants in the war on terror are inspired by radical Islam. They share the vision of imposing shari’a law worldwide.

We have been engaged in conflict with radical Islamicists since before 2001 and 9/11, and yet, I would venture to say that most U.S. citizens don’t have a clue about what shari’a is, have never heard of it.

Certainly, that is the case in my classrooms.

Time to wake up, ladies.

As I see it, the resistance to radical Islam is a feminist issue.

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2 thoughts on “Conflict with terror a feminist issue

  1. Janice Semmel says:

    Thank you for the explanation of shari’a law. I remember the story about Amina Lawal, but I didn’t realize that this was the law that governed her trial and punishment. What finally happened to her?

  2. Le Templar says:

    Hi there!

    I’m following up on my earlier comments about your blogs. It seems you are using this like a diary or journal, a place to share your thoughts about what happening in your life or around the world. I like that you are still making them informative and useful; it’s a nice blending of the personal and the journalism that we are aiming for with this blog project. I’m advising everyone this week to try embedding some multi-media audio or video with an upcoming blog post. WordPress should have a pretty good YouTube tool to use. Some professional bloggers believe sites don’t count as blogs unless you’ve got some multi-media going on.
    Le

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